Can this startup give everyone access to the moon?

To explore space, we first have to finish exploring the moon. And to do that, we need to be able to navigate and travel the moon the way we navigate and travel Earth. That’s Astrobotic’s bread and butter. The Pittsburgh company’s proprietary navigation system allows lunar spacecraft to land within yards—rather than miles—of the intended target. And the goal is to use the tech to offer the world an affordable, routine delivery service to the moon.

Going back to the moon may seem like retreading 20th century history, but as the Astrobotic team points out, we’ve barely scratched its surface. Previous missions to the moon—which has a surface area roughly the size of Australia and Africa combined—were short-lived and limited to small patches of the moon’s surface.

“We need to go back to become a multi-planet species.” – John Thornton, CEO of Astrobotic

“There’s still a lot of mystery there and we need to go back for different reasons this time,” says Astrobotic CEO John Thornton. “We need to go back to stay. We need to go back to push humanity beyond Earth. We need to go back to become a multi-planet species.”

Related
How NASA is planning to prevent a Martian plague 
When Mars samples arrive, they may carry more than knowledge. To offset the chance of a Martian pandemic, NASA is learning to contain a Red Planet plague.
This logarithmic view of the Universe will blow your mind
From here to the limits of what we can see, here’s a breathtaking illustrated logarithmic view of the Universe.
There are more galaxies in the Universe than even Carl Sagan ever imagined
There are between 6 and 20 trillion galaxies out there. Carl Sagan’s “billions and billions” was far too low of a guess.
The Universe is flat. Here’s what that teaches us. 
When we measure it, we find that our Universe really is flat. Here’s what we can learn from that, and why it matters so much.
Newly discovered exoplanet may be first covered in liquid water 
The first ocean planet may have just been discovered in the “Goldilocks zone” of a star 100 light-years from Earth.
Up Next
Subscribe to Freethink for more great stories