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Brain surgery is never easy -- for the doctor or the patient. Now, virtual reality is changing the game. Surgical Theater has created a revolutionary new tool, powered by Intel technology, that allows surgeons and patients to prepare for complicated new surgeries in ways never before possible.

Surgeons have previously had to rely on 2D images and their imagination to visualize a surgery, but now they are able to use 3D, VR headsets to see what it will actually look like when they perform the surgery - and practice doing it. And patients benefit by being able to see and understand how their condition will be treated. Learn more about the work Intel is doing to power the future of healthcare intelligence at intel.com/healthcare

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Prosthetics
Developing a Better Mind-Controlled Prosthetic Hand
prosthetic hand
Prosthetics
Developing a Better Mind-Controlled Prosthetic Hand
This new technique allows a person to control their prosthetic hand precisely and in real-time by amplifying the nerve signals from their residual limb.

This new technique allows a person to control their prosthetic hand precisely and in real-time by amplifying the nerve signals from their residual limb.

Cyborgs
Scientists Engineered “Cyborg Grasshoppers” to Sniff out Bombs
Scientists Engineered “Cyborg Grasshoppers” to Sniff out Bombs
Cyborgs
Scientists Engineered “Cyborg Grasshoppers” to Sniff out Bombs
By implanting electrodes into the brains of grasshoppers, scientists were able to harness the insects’ sense of smell for the purpose of explosive detection.

By implanting electrodes into the brains of grasshoppers, scientists were able to harness the insects’ sense of smell for the purpose of explosive detection.

Opinion
A Molecular Biologist Discusses the Morality of Genetic Engineering
A Molecular Biologist Discusses the Morality of Gene Editing
Opinion
A Molecular Biologist Discusses the Morality of Genetic Engineering
Molecular biologist Daisy Robinton speaks out on our moral imperative to solve some of humanity's greatest health threats.
By Daisy Robinton, Ph.D.

Molecular biologist Daisy Robinton speaks out on our moral imperative to solve some of humanity's greatest health threats.

Dispatches
Mosquitoes Are the Deadliest Animals in History. Should We Wipe Them Out?
deadliest animal - the mosquito
Dispatches
Mosquitoes Are the Deadliest Animals in History. Should We Wipe Them Out?
The world's richest and poorest people are teaming up against our deadliest predator.

The world's richest and poorest people are teaming up against our deadliest predator.

INTEL
Why Cancer Patients Should Get Genetic Sequencing
Why Cancer Patients Should Get Genetic Sequencing
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INTEL
Why Cancer Patients Should Get Genetic Sequencing
Genomic sequencing saved his live. Now he wants everyone to have access.
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After he was diagnosed with life-threatening prostate cancer, Intel’s Bryce Olson sequenced his genome which offered clues to new treatments for his disease. While the current standard of care for cancer patients includes surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, genetic sequencing opens the door for new possibilities beyond these traditional approaches. Bryce explains his personal mission to encourage others to get their...

Intel
The Future of Cancer Research
The Future of Cancer Research
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Intel
The Future of Cancer Research
Intel's Bryce Olson used genomic sequencing to help fight his cancer. Now he’s helping researchers use artificial intelligence to discover entirely new cancer treatments.
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Intel employee Bryce Olson was diagnosed with stage 4 prostate cancer. When the standard of care didn’t work, Bryce turned to genomic sequencing which allowed his doctors to identify specific genetic drivers of his disease and specific treatments and clinical trials that were a fit for his cancer. This precision medicine approach helped send his cancer into remission for several years. Now that his cancer has returned,...

Science
The Four Weirdest Things We've Sent to Space
The Four Weirdest Things We've Sent to Space
Science
The Four Weirdest Things We've Sent to Space
We take a look at a few of the not-so-obviously-bizarre things we've launched beyond the earth's atmosphere.
By Mike Riggs

We take a look at a few of the not-so-obviously-bizarre things we've launched beyond the earth's atmosphere.

The New Space Race
A Delivery Service for the Moon
A Delivery Service for the Moon
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The New Space Race
A Delivery Service for the Moon
This startup wants to offer the world insanely accurate shipping to the moon.
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Landing on the moon has always been an inaccurate pursuit. But Astrobotic has fixed that problem. The company’s unique GPS system allows it to land spacecraft within meters—rather than kilometers—of the intended target. And now they’re using the tech to offer the world’s first delivery service to the moon.

Superhuman
Robotic Wheelchair Revolution
Robotic Wheelchair Revolution
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Superhuman
Robotic Wheelchair Revolution
Part Wheelchair. Part Robot. Is this the future of accessibility?
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How Rory Cooper Built the Custom Wheelchair When people think about using wheelchairs, they probably don’t envision a custom design. Instead, they picture a bulky frame, handicap ramps, special vans for transportation with archaic wheelchair lifts, and a design out of the past. The sad truth is wheelchair technology has changed very little in the last 200 years. And over time, these dated designs can cause physical injury...