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Move the World.

Real-time translation seeks to break down all language barriers in the world. Several tech companies believe they are on the verge of making this a reality through new devices such as Google's Pixel Bud headphones, which can translate up to 40 languages in one to two seconds.

While the technology is still a work in progress, Google and others hope it might not be long before such technologies can help connect the world even further.

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Computer Science
Crowdsourcing the Seed for Coronavirus Antiviral Medications
antiviral medications
Computer Science
Crowdsourcing the Seed for Coronavirus Antiviral Medications
Foldit players are solving a protein structure puzzle that could help kickstart coronavirus antiviral medications.

Foldit players are solving a protein structure puzzle that could help kickstart coronavirus antiviral medications.

Dope Science
Marijuana and Autism: Removing the Stigma
Removing the stigma of marijuana and autism
Dope Science
Marijuana and Autism: Removing the Stigma
Research is beginning to prove the hopeful connection between marijuana and autism treatment for symptom relief. Here is one man’s inspiring story.
By Kurt Hackbarth

Research is beginning to prove the hopeful connection between marijuana and autism treatment for symptom relief. Here is one man’s inspiring story.

Seachange
Researchers Found a Species of Stony Coral Ready to Withstand Climate Change
Researchers Found a Species of Stony Coral Ready to Withstand Climate Change
Seachange
Researchers Found a Species of Stony Coral Ready to Withstand Climate Change
At current trends, more than 90% of the world’s coral reefs will be massively degraded by 2050. Researchers have found a species of stoney coral that has sparked new efforts for coral reef restoration.

At current trends, more than 90% of the world’s coral reefs will be massively degraded by 2050. Researchers have found a species of stoney coral that has sparked new efforts for coral reef restoration.

Intel
The Future of Cancer Research
The Future of Cancer Research
Watch Now
Intel
The Future of Cancer Research
Intel's Bryce Olson used genomic sequencing to help fight his cancer. Now he’s helping researchers use artificial intelligence to discover entirely new cancer treatments.
Watch Now

Intel employee Bryce Olson was diagnosed with stage 4 prostate cancer. When the standard of care didn’t work, Bryce turned to genomic sequencing which allowed his doctors to identify specific genetic drivers of his disease and specific treatments and clinical trials that were a fit for his cancer. This precision medicine approach helped send his cancer into remission for several years. Now that his cancer has returned,...

Dispatches
A New Brain Surgery Robot Can Work Inside an MRI
A New Brain Surgery Robot Can Work Inside an MRI
Dispatches
A New Brain Surgery Robot Can Work Inside an MRI
Metal robots and electric motors don't normally play well with giant magnets.

Metal robots and electric motors don't normally play well with giant magnets.

Dispatches
We Found the Oldest Human Virus: It's Familiar (but Weird)
Ancient Human Viruses Weird and Familiar
Dispatches
We Found the Oldest Human Virus: It's Familiar (but Weird)
The discovery cracks open a 7,000-year history of human-virus warfare. And it's raising weird questions.

The discovery cracks open a 7,000-year history of human-virus warfare. And it's raising weird questions.

Dispatches
Glowing Cancer Cells Could Find Hidden Tumors (And Replace Mammograms)
Glowing Cancer Cells Could Find Hidden Tumors (And Replace Mammograms)
Dispatches
Glowing Cancer Cells Could Find Hidden Tumors (And Replace Mammograms)
A new pill can make cancer cells glow under infrared light, and it could eliminate for mammograms.

A new pill can make cancer cells glow under infrared light, and it could eliminate for mammograms.