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This surgeon, Dr. Sunil Singhal, is making tumors glow to help doctors ensure they have removed all of the cancer cells at the surgery site. Completely removing cancer tumors can be difficult, and if a small amount remains, the cancer can recur. Sunil, the director of the Thoracic Surgery Research Laboratory at the University of Pennsylvania, came up with the idea of using glowing tumors to advance cancer surgery after an instance where it recurred in a young patient his team was confident they had cured. By using fluorescent dyes and delivery mechanisms for small drugs, they are able to imbue the cancer cells with fluorescent dye and then use ultraviolet light to make them glow. After 10 years in development, it is now in use - and is a notable improvement to cancer surgery, as it turns out around 10% of the surgeries would otherwise leave cancer cells behind.

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Prosthetics
How a Paralympic Swimmer Helps Advance AI Bionic Limbs
morgan stickney
Prosthetics
How a Paralympic Swimmer Helps Advance AI Bionic Limbs
Morgan Stickney shares about her experimental Ewing amputations and training for the 2024 Paralympics.

Morgan Stickney shares about her experimental Ewing amputations and training for the 2024 Paralympics.

Bionics
Run Faster, Think Better: Hugh Herr on the Future of Bionics
Run Faster, Think Better: Hugh Herr on the Future of Bionics
Bionics
Run Faster, Think Better: Hugh Herr on the Future of Bionics
Hugh Herr, head of Biomechatronics research at MIT and hailed as a bionic pioneer, is working to close the gap between synthetic limbs and the brain.

Hugh Herr, head of Biomechatronics research at MIT and hailed as a bionic pioneer, is working to close the gap between synthetic limbs and the brain.

Mysteries of Science
What Is Static Electricity? We May Finally Have an Answer.
Schematics showing the flow of electricity in two common static electricity experiences. Illustration by Teresa Stanton.
Mysteries of Science
What Is Static Electricity? We May Finally Have an Answer.
This model, created by doctoral students, provides a convincing explanation for a mystery that is thousands of years old - the cause of static electricity.

This model, created by doctoral students, provides a convincing explanation for a mystery that is thousands of years old - the cause of static electricity.

Dispatches
Hacking the Brain's Comms Network – without Surgery
Hacking the Brain's Comms Network – without Surgery
Dispatches
Hacking the Brain's Comms Network – without Surgery
When nerve cells in the brain communicate, they create tiny electric fields that can be sensed – and sometimes...
By Salvatore Domenic Morgera

When nerve cells in the brain communicate, they create tiny electric fields that can be sensed – and sometimes altered – from outside the skull.

Dispatches
A Skin Graft Cures Cocaine Cravings (in Mice)
A Skin Graft Cures Cocaine Cravings (in Mice)
Dispatches
A Skin Graft Cures Cocaine Cravings (in Mice)
A CRISPR skin graft looks like a promising way to deliver gene therapy.
By Qingyao Kong

A CRISPR skin graft looks like a promising way to deliver gene therapy.

Dispatches
New Tech Makes Fresh Produce Last Twice as Long
New Tech Makes Fresh Produce Last Twice as Long
Dispatches
New Tech Makes Fresh Produce Last Twice as Long
The plant-based preservative could radically change the game on food waste.

The plant-based preservative could radically change the game on food waste.

Science
Bionic Prosthetic Grants Amputee Musician a Rocking Encore
Bionic Prosthetic Grants Amputee Musician a Rocking Encore
Science
Bionic Prosthetic Grants Amputee Musician a Rocking Encore
How might your life change if you lost an arm? After losing his right arm in an electrical accident, Jason wasn’t...
By Blake Snow

How might your life change if you lost an arm? After losing his right arm in an electrical accident, Jason wasn’t sure if he’d ever be able to drum again.

Wrong
Beware the Frankenbabies!
Beware the Frankenbabies!
Watch Now
Wrong
Beware the Frankenbabies!
Frightening predictions almost stopped the invention that has helped millions of families.
Watch Now

As scientists began to develop in-vitro fertilization in the ‘70s for parents struggling to have a baby, experts and media piled on with frightening predictions that almost stopped the invention that has helped millions of families today dead in its track.