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Move the World.

Ben Chan searches sewers, lakes, and pig farms all around the world for bacteriophages (bacteria-destroying viruses) that could help fight antibiotic-resistant bacteria, also known as “superbugs.”

Paige is a young woman in Texas with cystic fibrosis who is suffering from a drug-resistant infection; Ben’s experimental phage therapy is her last resort. We follow Ben as he travels from his laboratory at Yale to Lubbock, Texas, to deliver the treatment — and meet Paige as she shows us what life is like before and after this experimental phage therapy.

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The Sound of Science
This Electronic Musician Is Transforming the Soundscape of Hospitals
This Electronic Musician Is Transforming the Soundscape of Hospitals
The Sound of Science
This Electronic Musician Is Transforming the Soundscape of Hospitals
Trained as a classical pianist, ambient artist Yoko Sen is on a mission to redesign medical devices' beeps and buzzes and save us from alarm fatigue.

Trained as a classical pianist, ambient artist Yoko Sen is on a mission to redesign medical devices' beeps and buzzes and save us from alarm fatigue.

Superhuman
Wearable Robotic Suits Could Be Coming to a Store Near You
Wearable Robotic Suits Could Be Coming to a Store Near You
Superhuman
Wearable Robotic Suits Could Be Coming to a Store Near You
What can lift 500 pounds in each hand, walk for miles and miles with a heavy load, or leap over obstacles in a single bound? Humans - with the help of wearable robotics.

What can lift 500 pounds in each hand, walk for miles and miles with a heavy load, or leap over obstacles in a single bound? Humans - with the help of wearable robotics. Alan Asbeck anticipates in less than a decade, everyone will have seen somebody donned in a robot suit. “I've wished I had one when moving from house to house or when shoveling snow,” he said. Asbeck is a real-life...

Longreads
How to Fix Science Funding
science funding
Longreads
How to Fix Science Funding
Basic science funding is a mess. Fixing it could radically improve the pace of innovation.

Basic science funding is a mess. Fixing it could radically improve the pace of innovation.

An Address for Everywhere on Earth
An Address for Everywhere on Earth
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An Address for Everywhere on Earth
Can three simple words change how we find each other?
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We take addresses for granted - but billions of people and places don’t have them, and it’s a big problem. Whether it’s voting, disaster relief, or pinpointing a spot on festival grounds, not having an address makes things that should be simple difficult. Enter Chris Sheldrick, who coordinated events in the music industry where he was frustrated by address-related problems. He created What3Words, a method of dividing the...

Dispatches
Finding a New Drug in One-Third the Time and One-Thousandth the Cost
Finding a New Drug in One-Third the Time and One-Thousandth the Cost
Dispatches
Finding a New Drug in One-Third the Time and One-Thousandth the Cost
How a pediatric cancer drug went from discovery to clinical trials in five years and just $500,000.
By Teresa Purzner

How a pediatric cancer drug went from discovery to clinical trials in five years and just $500,000.

3 Ways To Think About the Future
3 Ways To Think About the Future
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3 Ways To Think About the Future
Why don’t we have a moon base? A cartoonist and a scientist explain.
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Zach Weinersmith, creator of the Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal webcomic and Kelly Weinersmith, professor and scientist, explain how to think about the future - a focus of their new illustrated book “Soonish: Ten Emerging Technologies That'll Improve and/or Ruin Everything.” The New York Times best-selling book has been praised for its exciting and nuanced looks at ten technologies that could change the world...

Dispatches
Personal Genetics Might Solve the Opioid Crisis – and the Pain Crisis
Personal Genetics Might Solve the Opioid Crisis – and the Pain Crisis
Dispatches
Personal Genetics Might Solve the Opioid Crisis – and the Pain Crisis
Why does pain hurt more for some people? Why do others feel nothing at all?
By Erin Young

Why does pain hurt more for some people? Why do others feel nothing at all?

Dispatches
Two Billion People Have TB. What Should We Do about It?
Two Billion People Have TB. What Should We Do about It?
Dispatches
Two Billion People Have TB. What Should We Do about It?
In the fight against TB, sometimes it's better to just get along.

In the fight against TB, sometimes it's better to just get along.

Superhuman
These Gloves Can Teach You to Play the Piano. And Maybe Heal Your Brain.
These Gloves Can Teach You to Play the Piano. And Maybe Heal Your Brain.
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Superhuman
These Gloves Can Teach You to Play the Piano. And Maybe Heal Your Brain.
Through "passive haptic learning", these gloves can teach you how to play the piano in an hour. Braille in four hours. Now researchers want to see if victims of traumatic brain injuries can use these gloves to re-learn critical skills.
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Georgia Tech researchers Thad Starner and Caitlyn Seim have developed a pair of gloves for playing piano that can magically get you up to speed in just an hour. They've also taught blind people to read braille in four hours, a process that usually takes up to four months. The gloves work through a process called passive haptic learning, and is another great discovery from Georgia Tech researchers. Basically, they vibrate in...

Dispatches
Glowing Cancer Cells Could Find Hidden Tumors (And Replace Mammograms)
Glowing Cancer Cells Could Find Hidden Tumors (And Replace Mammograms)
Dispatches
Glowing Cancer Cells Could Find Hidden Tumors (And Replace Mammograms)
A new pill can make cancer cells glow under infrared light, and it could eliminate for mammograms.

A new pill can make cancer cells glow under infrared light, and it could eliminate for mammograms.