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If you are tired of seeing your news feed clogged constantly with political commentary, take the time to consider that it might actually be a good thing. For most of history, it was difficult for the average citizen to share his or her opinion. However, the dawn of social media has created a platform for the free flow of ideas. Sadly, still throughout much of the world, individuals are limited in their abilities to express their political opinions online, since they face severe consequences for doing so. While the constant political back-and-forth may be tiresome, it is good to keep in mind that the freedom to express one's point of view is a critical component to our system of government.

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Future of Medicine
Does Playing Sports Quiet the Brain?
Does Playing Sports Quiet the Brain?
Future of Medicine
Does Playing Sports Quiet the Brain?
Athletes across many sports have something in common - they can more easily “quiet” their brain to focus on what’s really going on.
By Caroline Delbert

Athletes across many sports have something in common - they can more easily “quiet” their brain to focus on what’s really going on.

Global Health
Could Another Measles Outbreak Open up Pandora’s Box?
Could Another Measles Outbreak Open up Pandora’s Box?
Global Health
Could Another Measles Outbreak Open up Pandora’s Box?
The global resurgence of measles has sparked renewed scientific interest in this old foe. If the theory — which is contested — turns out to be true, a measles infection could be less an isolated bout of illness and more a Pandora’s box.

The global resurgence of measles has sparked renewed scientific interest in this old foe. If the theory — which is contested — turns out to be true, a measles infection could be less an isolated bout of illness and more a Pandora’s box.

Dispatches
We're Mapping 100 Trillion Human Cells (and All of Their Genes)
We're Mapping 100 Trillion Human Cells (and All of Their Genes)
Dispatches
We're Mapping 100 Trillion Human Cells (and All of Their Genes)
The "Human BioMolecular Atlas" will map the active genes in over 200 types of cells and 80 different organ systems.
By Mark Atkinson

The "Human BioMolecular Atlas" will map the active genes in over 200 types of cells and 80 different organ systems.

Dispatches
A Skin Graft Cures Cocaine Cravings (in Mice)
A Skin Graft Cures Cocaine Cravings (in Mice)
Dispatches
A Skin Graft Cures Cocaine Cravings (in Mice)
A CRISPR skin graft looks like a promising way to deliver gene therapy.
By Qingyao Kong

A CRISPR skin graft looks like a promising way to deliver gene therapy.

Meet the Amateur Astronomer Who Found a Lost NASA Satellite
Meet the Amateur Astronomer Who Found a Lost NASA Satellite
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Meet the Amateur Astronomer Who Found a Lost NASA Satellite
A $130 million satellite vanished. Over a decade later, a blogger/astronomer found it.
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Amateur astronomer Scott Tilley made international headlines when he rediscovered NASA’s IMAGE satellite, 13 years after it mysteriously disappeared. In this interview with Freethink, Scott discusses his role in the satellite’s recovery, why he enjoys amateur astronomy, and how citizen scientists like him have contributed to our knowledge of space from the space race to the present day.

INTEL
Bringing Virtual Reality to Brain Surgery
Bringing Virtual Reality to Brain Surgery
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INTEL
Bringing Virtual Reality to Brain Surgery
Virtual reality is helping surgeons and patients prepare for complicated, life-saving surgeries in ways never before possible.
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Brain surgery is never easy -- for the doctor or the patient. Now, virtual reality is changing the game. Surgical Theater has created a revolutionary new tool, powered by Intel technology, that allows surgeons and patients to prepare for complicated new surgeries in ways never before possible. Surgeons have previously had to rely on 2D images and their imagination to visualize a surgery, but now they are able to use 3D, VR...

Superhuman
Can Genetically Modified Pigs Be the Key to Treating Rare Diseases?
Can Genetically Modified Pigs Be the Key to Treating Rare Diseases?
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Superhuman
Can Genetically Modified Pigs Be the Key to Treating Rare Diseases?
When it comes to rare diseases, doctors often don’t have enough patients to determine the effectiveness of various treatments. Now, scientists are breeding pigs with the same genetic code as people with a disease in order to create a pool of test "patients" unlike any before.
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There are thousands of diseases known to modern medicine without any cure or treatment. Many are too rare to get much attention from doctors, governments, or drug companies. But the gene editing tool CRISPR is offering hope for people with rare and hard to study diseases, like the genetic disease known as NF1. There are tens of thousands of Americans with this tumor-causing nerve disease, but because it has over 4,000...

Superhuman
Meet the Paralyzed Man Who Can Walk Again
Meet the Paralyzed Man Who Can Walk Again
Superhuman
Meet the Paralyzed Man Who Can Walk Again
Robert is paralyzed from the chest down. But now a robotic exoskeleton is giving him what he calls "a second chance...
By Mike Riggs

Robert is paralyzed from the chest down. But now a robotic exoskeleton is giving him what he calls "a second chance at life."

Conor Russomanno on Exploring Our Limits
Conor Russomanno on Exploring Our Limits
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Conor Russomanno on Exploring Our Limits
Could linking our brains to computers allow the mind to control the world outside of our bodies?
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Conor Russomanno’s interest in his own brain started with a bump on his head. A concussion he sustained during a game of rugby altered his perception of the world for months afterward. And that change got him thinking about the relationship between his physical brain and the way he thinks. To help him better understand himself--and to help other people understand themselves--he partnered with Joel Murphy to start...