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With the use of facial recognition technology on the rise, privacy advocates are increasingly concerned about the potential for misuse. Artist Adam Harvey is working to show how fashion can be used to fool facial recognition technology. His most recent project, CV Dazzle, is a scarf with fabric that looks like camouflage but contains elements that mimic a human face. These elements can successfully confuse the software and make identification much more difficult. While everyone might not be willing to rock such a bold fashion statement, Harvey's work raises important questions about personal privacy.

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Superhuman
Electric Skin Gives Sensation Back to Amputees
Electric Skin Gives Sensation Back to Amputees
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Superhuman
Electric Skin Gives Sensation Back to Amputees
Touch is a sensation that connects us all. This scientist created electronic skin that lets people with prosthetic limbs feel.
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For amputees, the sensation of a ‘phantom limb’ can be a terrible or disorienting experience -- feeling a hand, arm or leg that isn’t there anymore. But researchers at Johns Hopkins have recognized that these sensations are a clue, and they’re using it to restore the sense of touch.

Dispatches
Mosquitoes Are the Deadliest Animals in History. Should We Wipe Them Out?
deadliest animal - the mosquito
Dispatches
Mosquitoes Are the Deadliest Animals in History. Should We Wipe Them Out?
The world's richest and poorest people are teaming up against our deadliest predator.

The world's richest and poorest people are teaming up against our deadliest predator.

Dispatches
How NASA Scientists Learned to Stick with Super Long-Term Goals
How NASA Scientists Learned to Stick with Super Long-Term Goals
Dispatches
How NASA Scientists Learned to Stick with Super Long-Term Goals
When the New Horizons spacecraft launched in 2006, Pluto was still a planet and the iPhone didn't exist.
By Bruce Barry and Thomas Bateman

When the New Horizons spacecraft launched in 2006, Pluto was still a planet and the iPhone didn't exist.

Growing Food with Seawater
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Growing Food with Seawater
This designer invented a greenhouse that lets you grow food with seawater.
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Water is in short supply in much of the world — but what if we use seawater? It’s been a dream for years, but now technology is making it possible. This new seawater greenhouse uses a clever cardboard design to distill fresh water from salt water cheaply and efficiently. It’s helping grow crops in Somaliland, and could help stop the water crisis in Africa and other parts of the world that are susceptible to drought. The...

Dispatches
Robots Are Mass Producing Mini-Organs
Robots Are Mass Producing Mini-Organs
Dispatches
Robots Are Mass Producing Mini-Organs
Robots can make hundreds of tiny copies of your organs, allowing doctors to test many different treatments at the...

Robots can make hundreds of tiny copies of your organs, allowing doctors to test many different treatments at the same time.

Superhuman
These Gloves Can Teach You to Play the Piano. And Maybe Heal Your Brain.
These Gloves Can Teach You to Play the Piano. And Maybe Heal Your Brain.
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Superhuman
These Gloves Can Teach You to Play the Piano. And Maybe Heal Your Brain.
Through "passive haptic learning", these gloves can teach you how to play the piano in an hour. Braille in four hours. Now researchers want to see if victims of traumatic brain injuries can use these gloves to re-learn critical skills.
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Georgia Tech researchers Thad Starner and Caitlyn Seim have developed a pair of gloves for playing piano that can magically get you up to speed in just an hour. They've also taught blind people to read braille in four hours, a process that usually takes up to four months. The gloves work through a process called passive haptic learning, and is another great discovery from Georgia Tech researchers. Basically, they vibrate in...

Superhuman
Stem Cells Give Paralyzed Man Movement
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Superhuman
Stem Cells Give Paralyzed Man Movement
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After a devastating car accident, Lucas Lindner was left almost completely paralyzed. But an injection of embryonic stem cells in his spinal cord has given him back almost complete function of his arms and hands.

Coded
Meet the Programmer Who Defied the FBI
Meet the Programmer Who Defied the FBI
Coded
Meet the Programmer Who Defied the FBI
Ladar Levison spent 10 years building his business, then destroyed it all in one night when the FBI came knocking.
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Ladar Levison spent 10 years building his business, then destroyed it all in one night when the FBI came knocking.

Superhuman
Reversing Blindness
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Reversing Blindness
Vanna was legally blind. Now she can see. Hear her inspiring story and meet the amazing doctors who gave her back her sight.
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Vanna started to notice a change in her vision. Six months later, she was legally blind. But Vanna never lost hope, and enrolled in an experimental clinical trial. Her doctors injected stem cells from her hip into her optic nerve. Afterwards, she started to regain her vision. Amazingly, Vanna can now see. This is the story of reversing blindness.