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Lead image courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The coronavirus crisis is unique. Addressing it will require new ideas, new perspectives, and new voices. That's our mission at Freethink.

In our daily "Coronavirus Roundup," we're highlighting the most important stories from the frontlines of the fight against COVID-19. Stories that inform, challenge, and inspire.

Here are our must reads for today, March 24, 2020.

1. How the Virus Got Out

In the span of just a few months, the novel coronavirus has infected more than 370,000 people. This visuals-heavy New York Times story illustrates why travel restrictions weren't enough to stop the virus from spreading — highlighting the mistakes we'll need to learn from to avoid similar pandemics in the future.

2. Navy Hospital Ship Deployed to L.A. to Help Non-Coronavirus Patients

A new Los Angeles Times article details several recent coronavirus response efforts, including the Navy's deployment of its San Diego-based hospital ship Mercy up the coast to Los Angeles. There, it'll treat patients who don't have the coronavirus, freeing LA-based hospitals to focus more resources on the outbreak.

3. Help Wanted: Grocery Stores, Pizza Chains, and Amazon Are Hiring

The coronavirus outbreak has forced massive layoffs across the U.S. and beyond. At the same time, it's left grocery stores, pharmacies, and food delivery services scrambling to meet increased demand. This New York Times story rounds up all the companies that need new employees, stat.

4. Coronavirus: South Korea Reports Lowest Number of New Cases in Four Weeks

Outside of China, no Asian nation has been hit harder by the coronavirus outbreak than South Korea. A new BBC article explains why the worst may now be behind the country — and what it'll need to do to avoid backsliding.

5. Flu Drug May Be an Effective New Coronavirus Treatment

After conducting a pair of clinical trials, Chinese health officials concluded that the Japanese flu drug favipiravir is a safe and effective coronavirus treatment. Freethink digs into what it could mean for the COVID-19 outbreak if they're right — and why some health experts don't believe they are.

Up Next

If you want to understand a problem, talk to the people working on solutions. Join us as we meet the people and explore the ideas on the frontlines of an unprecedented global response.

Public Health
Here Is Every Potential Coronavirus Treatment and Vaccine
coronavirus treatment
Public Health
Here Is Every Potential Coronavirus Treatment and Vaccine
Across the globe, researchers are scrambling to find a coronavirus treatment or vaccine that could bring the COVID-19 outbreak to a swift end.

Across the globe, researchers are scrambling to find a coronavirus treatment or vaccine that could bring the COVID-19 outbreak to a swift end.

Public Health
How to Make 100 Million Doses of Coronavirus Vaccine in a Year
coronavirus vaccine
Public Health
How to Make 100 Million Doses of Coronavirus Vaccine in a Year
Creating a new vaccine is slow and expensive. One biotech firm thinks a “plug-and-play” vaccine could change that.

Creating a new vaccine is slow and expensive. One biotech firm thinks a “plug-and-play” vaccine could change that.

Public Health
AI Can Detect Coronavirus Infections Far Faster Than Humans
detect coronavirus
Public Health
AI Can Detect Coronavirus Infections Far Faster Than Humans
New artificial intelligence systems can detect coronavirus infections far faster than human doctors and could help end the COVID-19 outbreak.

New artificial intelligence systems can detect coronavirus infections far faster than human doctors and could help end the COVID-19 outbreak.

Public Health
Blood Plasma From Coronavirus Survivors Could Save Lives
coronavirus survivors
Public Health
Blood Plasma From Coronavirus Survivors Could Save Lives
A drug company is using the blood plasma of coronavirus survivors to develop a treatment for those still battling the disease.

A drug company is using the blood plasma of coronavirus survivors to develop a treatment for those still battling the disease.

Public Health
What Is Protecting Kids Against the Coronavirus?
children coronavirus
Public Health
What Is Protecting Kids Against the Coronavirus?
Something is protecting kids against the coronavirus, and researchers want to figure out what it is so they can use it to develop a treatment.

Something is protecting kids against the coronavirus, and researchers want to figure out what it is so they can use it to develop a treatment.

Robotics
The Coronavirus Hospital Staffed by Robots
coronavirus hospital
Robotics
The Coronavirus Hospital Staffed by Robots
A robot-run coronavirus hospital in Wuhan, China, is just one remarkable example of how technology is helping combat the global COVID-19 outbreak.

A robot-run coronavirus hospital in Wuhan, China, is just one remarkable example of how technology is helping combat the global COVID-19 outbreak.

Medical Innovation
Experts Are 3D Printing Coronavirus Supplies for Hospitals
coronavirus supplies
Medical Innovation
Experts Are 3D Printing Coronavirus Supplies for Hospitals
After an Italian firm 3D printed in-demand coronavirus supplies for a hospital, others in the community were inspired to offer their own help.

After an Italian firm 3D printed in-demand coronavirus supplies for a hospital, others in the community were inspired to offer their own help.

Artificial Intelligence
Your Voice Could Help Train an AI to Detect Coronavirus
detecting coronavirus
Artificial Intelligence
Your Voice Could Help Train an AI to Detect Coronavirus
The Corona Voice Detect project is developing an AI-powered system to detect coronavirus infections based on a sample of a person’s voice.

The Corona Voice Detect project is developing an AI-powered system to detect coronavirus infections based on a sample of a person’s voice.

Computer Science
Our Spare Computer Is Helping Fight Coronavirus. Yours Can, Too.
fight coronavirus
Computer Science
Our Spare Computer Is Helping Fight Coronavirus. Yours Can, Too.
Help fight the coronavirus by donating your spare computing power to Folding@home, which will use it to run valuable protein-folding simulations.

Help fight the coronavirus by donating your spare computing power to Folding@home, which will use it to run valuable protein-folding simulations.