Skip to main content
Move the World.

Heather Dewey-Hagborg never leaves a trace of herself anywhere.

An artist and activist, Hagborg wants to make sure people understand the hidden secrets in the DNA they leave behind everywhere they go - and what people can do with them.

One of her early projects was called Stranger Visions. For the project, Hagborg collected discarded gum, cigarettes, strands of hair, and anything else that could hold traces of human DNA. She then took them to her lab for analysis and used the data in the DNA to 3D-print renderings of the people who had discarded the items.

For her latest project, called Invisible, Hagborg developed a spray that can mask your DNA wherever it’s left. As many people are quick to point out, her spray could be used by criminals too. But most powerful tools can be used for both good and evil, and Hagborg is convinced that as technology develops, Invisible will be an essential piece in preserving our safety and privacy.

Up Next

Uprising
Diving Deep Into the Brain to Measure Neurotransmitters
Using computation psychiatry to study the brain
Uprising
Diving Deep Into the Brain to Measure Neurotransmitters
Researchers are taking the first measurements of neurotransmitters in active human brains, using computational psychiatry to understand how the mind works.

Researchers are taking the first measurements of neurotransmitters in active human brains, using computational psychiatry to understand how the mind works.

Superhuman
Electric Skin Gives Sensation Back to Amputees
Electric Skin Gives Sensation Back to Amputees
Watch Now
Superhuman
Electric Skin Gives Sensation Back to Amputees
Touch is a sensation that connects us all. This scientist created electronic skin that lets people with prosthetic limbs feel.
Watch Now

For amputees, the sensation of a ‘phantom limb’ can be a terrible or disorienting experience -- feeling a hand, arm or leg that isn’t there anymore. But researchers at Johns Hopkins have recognized that these sensations are a clue, and they’re using it to restore the sense of touch.

INTEL
Why Cancer Patients Should Get Genetic Sequencing
Why Cancer Patients Should Get Genetic Sequencing
Watch Now
INTEL
Why Cancer Patients Should Get Genetic Sequencing
Genomic sequencing saved his live. Now he wants everyone to have access.
Watch Now

After he was diagnosed with life-threatening prostate cancer, Intel’s Bryce Olson sequenced his genome which offered clues to new treatments for his disease. While the current standard of care for cancer patients includes surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, genetic sequencing opens the door for new possibilities beyond these traditional approaches. Bryce explains his personal mission to encourage others to get their...

Dispatches
Insulin Pills Could Change Everything for Diabetics
insulin pills
Dispatches
Insulin Pills Could Change Everything for Diabetics
A pill instead of a needle would be the "holy grail" for diabetes treatment.

A pill instead of a needle would be the "holy grail" for diabetes treatment.

Superhuman
Using Virtual Reality to Help Kids with Autism
Using Virtual Reality to Help Kids with Autism
Watch Now
Superhuman
Using Virtual Reality to Help Kids with Autism
A virtual world offers a new way to engage with kids on the spectrum.
Watch Now

When their autistic son fell in love with a virtual reality headset, Vibha and Vijay Ravindran got an idea: could this unlimited digital world help people who have trouble engaging in the physical world? Together, they founded a company called Floreo to develop VR programs for people with developmental disabilities, helping them break free from the constraints of their bodies and the typical pressures of their learning...

Superhuman
Can Genetically Modified Pigs Be the Key to Treating Rare Diseases?
Can Genetically Modified Pigs Be the Key to Treating Rare Diseases?
Watch Now
Superhuman
Can Genetically Modified Pigs Be the Key to Treating Rare Diseases?
When it comes to rare diseases, doctors often don’t have enough patients to determine the effectiveness of various treatments. Now, scientists are breeding pigs with the same genetic code as people with a disease in order to create a pool of test "patients" unlike any before.
Watch Now

There are thousands of diseases known to modern medicine without any cure or treatment. Many are too rare to get much attention from doctors, governments, or drug companies. But the gene editing tool CRISPR is offering hope for people with rare and hard to study diseases, like the genetic disease known as NF1. There are tens of thousands of Americans with this tumor-causing nerve disease, but because it has over 4,000...

Can Tech Giants Get Ahead of A.I.?
Can Tech Giants Get Ahead of A.I.?
Can Tech Giants Get Ahead of A.I.?
Companies gather to discuss impact of A.I. A possible neural lace breakthrough. And unmanned cargo ships. This is...
By Mike Riggs

Companies gather to discuss impact of A.I. A possible neural lace breakthrough. And unmanned cargo ships. This is the coolest stuff we've read this week.

Superhuman
The 3D-printed helmet that can read your mind. Could it change the world?
The 3D-printed helmet that can read your mind. Could it change the world?
Superhuman
The 3D-printed helmet that can read your mind. Could it change the world?
OpenBCI has developed technology that allows you to control the world outside your body with your brain waves.
By Mike Riggs

OpenBCI has developed technology that allows you to control the world outside your body with your brain waves.