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Move the World.

Satellites rule everything around us. They help us track potentially catastrophic storms, navigate traffic jams, lead us to hole-in-the-wall restaurants, and guide self-driving cars.

"We’re building a foundation because we see that someday, humanity could be using space to be better." - Joel Spark, co-founder of Spire

But the satellites of the future may look like the ones of the past. For decades, the satellites we launched into space were about as big as cars and weighed about as much (they also cost a fortune). But that could change, thanks to the “cubesats” made by companies like Spire. These satellites can fit in the palm of your hand and cost a fraction of their predecessors. They also burn to a crisp on reentry (which means no space pollution!), and transmit more data than several behemoth satellites combined. And that means they’re going to be the data-gathering tools of the future.

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Medical Innovation
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After an Italian firm 3D printed in-demand coronavirus supplies for a hospital, others in the community were inspired to offer their own help.

After an Italian firm 3D printed in-demand coronavirus supplies for a hospital, others in the community were inspired to offer their own help.

Cybersecurity
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Innovations in Sustainability
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genetically modified poplar trees
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The Edge
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From infrared pajamas to cryo chambers, athletes swear recovery methods give them an edge on the playing field. But what does science have to say about it?

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Future of Fertility
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Superhuman
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Dispatches
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Why Advanced Cancer Patients Need Genetic Sequencing
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After he was diagnosed with life-threatening prostate cancer, Intel’s Bryce Olson sequenced his genome which offered clues to new treatments for his disease. While the current standard of care for cancer patients includes surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, genetic sequencing opens the door for new possibilities beyond these traditional approaches. Bryce explains his personal mission to encourage others to get their...