Skip to main content
Move the World.

The thought of giving birth is terrifying for a lot of new mothers, and rightfully so. There's a host of complications that can arise in the delivery room, from excessive bleeding to fetal distress.

They're using robots that can blink, breathe, and make noise to enact real emergency situations.

But a group of healthcare professionals in Falls Church, Virginia is doing all they can to prepare themselves for the worst case scenario. They're using robotic birth simulators that can blink, breathe, and make noise, to enact real emergency situations. 

The Need for Better Medical Training

Medical training methods have come a long way, but there is certainly still room for improvement. Recent studies show that the maternal mortality rate has more than doubled in the past few decades.

In May of 2019, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that three out of five pregnancy-related deaths could have been prevented. In addition to a lack of access to healthcare, delayed diagnoses and missed warning signs by hospital staff were named key contributors to the statistic.

An ongoing USA Today investigation on the issue sparked involvement from Congress, after it detailed hospitals' "widespread failures" to follow national best practices for safety in the delivery room.

The House Ways and Means Committee is seeking answers from hospitals throughout the nation and released a statement saying, "With this investigation, we are committed to finding out why these deaths are happening and where Congress can take action to not only prevent these deaths, but also reverse this trend."

The Robotic Birth Simulator That's Saving Lives

Enter ICAMS, the Inova Center for Advanced Medical Simulation. With a state-of-the-art training facility, ICAMS helps doctors and nurses identify common mistakes and become more aware of red flags that could lead to a more serious issue.

Medical training

They use robotic, childbirth simulators that are programmed to react to all sorts of unique scenarios. In addition to operating under preset conditions, the medical mannequins can be controlled manually.

An operator outside of the practice delivery room has the ability to administer changes wirelessly to the mannequin's vitals. Being able to influence its temperature, respiratory and heart rates make the enactments all the more realistic.

ICAMS' training has helped shorten the length of hospital stays and hemorrhages. 

These futuristic birth simulators are a game-changer in the field of medical training and they've already proven their value in the hospital.

One team of doctors and nurses practiced a rare (one in 10,000) emergency scenario in which a pregnant mother went into cardiac arrest. Later that day, the team encountered the same exact issue. Because they were well-rehearsed, they were able to put their newfound skills into use and saved the mother's life.

Over the past year, the training provided at ICAMS has helped shorten the overall length of hospital stays at Inova medical centers. It's also decreased the amount of blood transfusions and hemorrhages. 

The Next Generation of Advanced Medical Training

The use of simulators in the medical field isn't new, but ICAMS is taking it to the next level. The Center focuses on providing world-class education using the latest technologies.

What sets ICAMS apart is how realistic its replicated hospital setting is, including an emergency department, labor and delivery unit, ICU, plus inpatient and outpatient rooms. But instead of patients, the rooms are filled with these robotic medical mannequins.

Medical simulation in action

And it doesn't stop there. Each mannequin is individually named and even has its own record in the hospital's system. One student has "delivered" babies from a medical mannequin named Noelle, four times.

The elaborate setup effectively replaces the traditional "see one, do one" method of medical training. ICAMS is a safe place for students to practice emergency procedures hands-on, and prepare for the pressure of these situations after they leave the program.

One med student said, "It helps you feel more comfortable in those sorts of situations because you know what's going on, you know what needs to happen... you've seen it play out already."

Meet the Medical Simulation Expert

Doctor Emily Marko at ICAMS

Doctor Emily Marko, Medical Director at ICAMS, never thought she would become a simulation expert. But after a retinal detachment caused her to temporarily lose her vision, she pursued a degree in medical education.

A firm believer in experiential learning, Dr. Marko took it upon herself to study up on programming birth simulators so she could use them to better prepare students for common obstetrical emergencies.

Every time you teach one student, one doctor, one nurse, you reach 1,000 patients because they touch all those people.

Dr. Emily Marko

She is now a teacher who oversees countless students in ICAMS' realistic hospital environment, using advanced simulation to facilitate "learning by doing."

"To build that kind of muscle memory and that preparation really takes doing drills," Dr. Marko says.

At ICAMS, Dr. Marko provides live feedback in the delivery room, while students diagnose and treat issues such as shoulder dystocia. Once the enactments are over, students debrief with video replays and evaluations that help make procedures even more efficient.

To Marko, the experience is invaluable - "Every time you teach one student, one doctor, one nurse, you reach 1,000 patients because they touch all those people."

For more interesting news about innovations in the medical field, from brain surgery robots to virtual reality training, subscribe to Freethink.

Subscribe

Explore More Stories

A New Reality
How to Spot a Deepfake
How to Spot a Deepfake
Watch Now
A New Reality
How to Spot a Deepfake
Is artificial intelligence the key to knowing what’s real?
Watch Now

Deepfake videos use video manipulation to show people saying and doing things they never have. These engineers are using blockchain technology to separate fact from fiction. Deepfakes, fake videos generated using artificial intelligence technology, could be the next frontier in misinformation. While news video has historically been the gold standard of veracity, an era where video can be easily created could further erode...

Sponsored
Can Science Make People Live Healthier for Longer?
Can Science Make People Live Healthier for Longer?
Watch Now
Sponsored
Can Science Make People Live Healthier for Longer?
An MIT researcher has turned 30 years of aging research into something you can use right now.
Watch Now

Most of medical science focuses on combating disease and managing the impact of aging. But one MIT researcher wants to tackle aging head on. Through decades of research, Dr. Leonard Guarente has uncovered a basic mechanism to regulate aging and co-founded Elysium to turn his research into a product. Elysium’s mission is to help people live healthier for longer. Freethink is proud to present this story in partnership with...

Dispatches
FDA Approves First Mute Button for Genetic Diseases
FDA Approves First Mute Button for Genetic Diseases
Dispatches
FDA Approves First Mute Button for Genetic Diseases
It is the first of "a wave of advances that have the potential to transform medicine."

It is the first of "a wave of advances that have the potential to transform medicine."

Science
Using Neuroscience to Talk to People in a Vegetative State
What is a vegetative state?
Watch Now
Science
Using Neuroscience to Talk to People in a Vegetative State
A scientist figures out how to talk to the brain when the body won't respond.
Watch Now

People who suffer extreme brain trauma sometimes fall into what is known as a "persistent vegetative state." What is a vegetative state and how is it different from a coma? Unlike a coma, where the patient is completely immobile and unconscious, people in a vegetative state will sleep, wake, and open their eyes — without showing any sign of awareness or consciousness. They don't speak, move on their own, or respond to...

Superhuman
Helping Kids Walk With Wearable Robots
Helping Kids Walk With Wearable Robots
Watch Now
Superhuman
Helping Kids Walk With Wearable Robots
Exoskeletons aren't just science fiction anymore. Wearable robots are helping kids with cerebral palsy walk.
Watch Now

Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common movement disorder in children, and nearly half of kids with CP can't walk own their own. As bones grow and muscles set incorrectly, walking becomes progressively more difficult. Extensive and repeated surgeries are often required to provide relief, but they can't solve the underlying problem. Now, engineers in the Biomechatronics Lab at Northern Arizona University are hoping that...

Coded
Meet the Programmer Who Defied the FBI
Meet the Programmer Who Defied the FBI
Coded
Meet the Programmer Who Defied the FBI
Ladar Levison spent 10 years building his business, then destroyed it all in one night when the FBI came knocking.
By Mike Riggs

Ladar Levison spent 10 years building his business, then destroyed it all in one night when the FBI came knocking.

This is Our Superhuman Future
This is Our Superhuman Future
This is Our Superhuman Future
With Thanksgiving winding down, take some time to join us on a journey to the frontier of medical technology.
By Mike Riggs

With Thanksgiving winding down, take some time to join us on a journey to the frontier of medical technology.

Superhuman
Meet the Mom Curing Her Daughter's Incurable Disease
Meet the Mom Curing Her Daughter's Incurable Disease
Superhuman
Meet the Mom Curing Her Daughter's Incurable Disease
Karen Aiach isn't a doctor and has never worked in medicine. But when doctors said her daughter wouldn't live past...
By Mike Riggs

Karen Aiach isn't a doctor and has never worked in medicine. But when doctors said her daughter wouldn't live past adolescence, she knew she had to get to work.

Superhuman
Superhuman Trailer
Superhuman Trailer
Watch Now
Superhuman
Superhuman Trailer
Join us as we meet the innovators building our superhuman future.
Watch Now

Superhuman is a Freethink original series about the amazing advances in medical innovation that are making the present look more like a sci-fi depiction of the future. Join us as we meet the engineers, entrepreneurs, doctors and patients who are giving people a new lease on life today, while building our superhuman future of tomorrow.