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A self-professed data nerd, Thomas Hargrove believes everything around us is following a mathematical formula...including murder. Hargrove wanted to find a way to use data to solve cold cases and identify potential serial killers that have gone unnoticed. Armed with public homicide records, he created an algorithm that can spot similar patterns across different cases. Each cluster is given an unique identifier -- what he calls a “Dewey Decimal System of death.” Through the Murder Accountability Project, Hargrove releases the data to the public and partners with local law enforcement to consult on ongoing investigations.

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Dispatches
Zika Could Be a "Smart Missile" for Brain Cancer
Zika Could Be a "Smart Missile" for Brain Cancer
Dispatches
Zika Could Be a "Smart Missile" for Brain Cancer
Zika can devastate fetal brains; scientists want to turn it against brain tumors instead.

Zika can devastate fetal brains; scientists want to turn it against brain tumors instead.

Dispatches
Scientists Want to Rewrite the Entire Human Genome, from Scratch
Scientists Want to Rewrite the Entire Human Genome, from Scratch
Dispatches
Scientists Want to Rewrite the Entire Human Genome, from Scratch
What if we could rewrite our entire genetic code to make us invincible against viruses?

What if we could rewrite our entire genetic code to make us invincible against viruses?

On The Fringe
These Bacteria-Eating Sewer Viruses are Saving Lives
These Bacteria-Eating Sewer Viruses are Saving Lives
On The Fringe
These Bacteria-Eating Sewer Viruses are Saving Lives
The world discovered phages before antibiotics, but these lowly sewer viruses are getting renewed attention in the...
By Blake Snow

The world discovered phages before antibiotics, but these lowly sewer viruses are getting renewed attention in the age of antibiotic resistance.

Dispatches
A Prosthetic Memory Can Help You Remember
A Prosthetic Memory Can Help You Remember
Dispatches
A Prosthetic Memory Can Help You Remember
Scientists have figured out how to hack the brain's memory.

Scientists have figured out how to hack the brain's memory.

Dispatches
SpaceX Internet Is Coming
SpaceX Internet Is Coming
Dispatches
SpaceX Internet Is Coming
The Internet... in space! What's not to love?

The Internet... in space! What's not to love?

Wrong
The Y2K Bug is Going to Bite!
The Y2K Bug is Going to Bite!
Watch Now
Wrong
The Y2K Bug is Going to Bite!
Did we narrowly avoid the apocalypse because of some world-saving last minute de-bugging.
Watch Now

In the months and days leading up to the year 2000, many grew alarmed that a computer bug would collapse networks and bring down economies and global stability in its wake. Did we narrowly avoid the apocalypse because of some world-saving last minute de-bugging? Or was the worldwide panic just way off base?

This week in ideas: How VR changes our dreams, a stem cell miracle, and the shoes...
This week in ideas: How VR changes our dreams, a stem cell miracle, and the shoes of the future
This week in ideas: How VR changes our dreams, a stem cell miracle, and the shoes...
Virtual reality users experience more lucid dreams, a paralyzed man gets movement back, and self-lacing shoes....
By Mike Riggs

Virtual reality users experience more lucid dreams, a paralyzed man gets movement back, and self-lacing shoes. These are our favorite stories this week.

Superhuman
Gaining Independence with the World's Most Advanced Prosthetic Arm
Gaining Independence with the World's Most Advanced Prosthetic Arm
Watch Now
Superhuman
Gaining Independence with the World's Most Advanced Prosthetic Arm
Jerral was hit by a roadside bomb in Iraq and left paralyzed. Now he's partnering with researchers to regain his independence. »
Watch Now

Jerral was serving in Iraq, his tank was hit by a roadside bomb. The attack left him paralyzed and without his left arm. But rather than letting his injuries define him, Jerral is fighting back with the help of the world’s most advanced prosthetic arm. He’s working with a team of researchers from Johns Hopkins to test the arm that could help Jerral and many other wounded vets like him take back their independence.