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Meet the Amateur Astronomer Who Found a Lost NASA Satellite

Amateur astronomer Scott Tilley made international headlines when he rediscovered NASA’s IMAGE satellite, 13 years after it mysteriously disappeared. In this interview with Freethink, Scott discusses his role in the satellite’s recovery, why he enjoys amateur astronomy, and how citizen scientists like him have contributed to our knowledge of space from the space race to the present day.

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Dispatches
Tiny Satellite “Constellations” Could Bring the Entire World Online
Tiny Satellite “Constellations” Could Bring the Entire World Online
Dispatches
Tiny Satellite “Constellations” Could Bring the Entire World Online
SpaceX is out in front, but the race for global satellite internet is getting crowded.
By Dan Bier

SpaceX is out in front, but the race for global satellite internet is getting crowded.

Technology
The Paralyzed Racer Going Faster than Ever
The Paralyzed Racer Going Faster than Ever
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Technology
The Paralyzed Racer Going Faster than Ever
This daredevil wouldn't let anything slow him down—not even a devastating bike accident.
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Mario Bonfante Jr. was paralyzed in a bike accident, but he’s still in hot pursuit of a racing career. He designed a device to allow him to race cars, and now he’s doing it internationally—and hoping to produce his device to help other paralyzed people drive.

Sponsored
Why Cancer Patients Should Get Genetic Sequencing
Why Cancer Patients Should Get Genetic Sequencing
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Sponsored
Why Cancer Patients Should Get Genetic Sequencing
Genomic sequencing saved his live. Now he wants everyone to have access.
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After he was diagnosed with life-threatening prostate cancer, Intel’s Bryce Olson sequenced his genome which offered clues to new treatments for his disease. While the current standard of care for cancer patients includes surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, genetic sequencing opens the door for new possibilities beyond these traditional approaches. Bryce explains his personal mission to encourage others to get their genome sequenced, how to do it, and why cancer patients…

Dispatches
What We Learned from a Decade of Commercial Space Travel
What We Learned from a Decade of Commercial Space Travel
Dispatches
What We Learned from a Decade of Commercial Space Travel
Businesses have gotten to space; now what?
By Joel Wooten

Businesses have gotten to space; now what?

Dispatches
A New Kind of Headset “Hears” Words You Don’t Say
A New Kind of Headset “Hears” Words You Don’t Say
Dispatches
A New Kind of Headset “Hears” Words You Don’t Say
The project, named AlterEgo, intentionally crosses the line between what's "out there" and what's in your head.
By Dan Bier

The project, named AlterEgo, intentionally crosses the line between what's "out there" and what's in your head.

Superhuman
The World’s First Bionic Drummer
The World’s First Bionic Drummer
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Superhuman
The World’s First Bionic Drummer
Jason Barnes lost his arm in a horrible accident. Then he became the fastest drummer in the world...
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Jason Barnes lost his arm in a horrible accident... and then he became the fastest drummer in the world. Now he’s working with doctors and engineers who are designing ultrasound sensors that could give him back fine motor control. Join us as he sits down to play piano for the first time since his accident. Today, the one-armed drummer has his sights set on conquering his next musical instrument: the…

Dispatches
SpaceX Internet Is Coming
SpaceX Internet Is Coming
Dispatches
SpaceX Internet Is Coming
The Internet... in space! What's not to love?
By Dan Bier

The Internet... in space! What's not to love?

On The Fringe
Can Snot Help Stop the Flu?
Can Snot Help Stop the Flu?
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On The Fringe
Can Snot Help Stop the Flu?
The flu is a really tough target. The virus evolves far too fast to really pin it down. If only…
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The flu is a really tough target. The virus evolves far too fast to really pin it down. If only they could slow it down. That seemed pretty much impossible until two researchers had a breakthrough that involved the mucus of cancer patients. And what they found could fundamentally change our perception of not only the flu, but evolution itself.