Skip to main content
Move the World.

After he was diagnosed with life-threatening prostate cancer, Intel’s Bryce Olson sequenced his genome which offered clues to new treatments for his disease. While the current standard of care for cancer patients includes surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, genetic sequencing opens the door for new possibilities beyond these traditional approaches. Bryce explains his personal mission to encourage others to get their genome sequenced, how to do it, and why cancer patients should tell their doctors “sequence me!”


Additional Resources

The National Institute of Health’s National Cancer Institute has a lot of helpful resources for people wanting to learn more about the topics discussed in the video. For an updated list of drugs approved by the FDA for various cancers go here, to learn more about getting your cancer sequenced, visit NCI's database, and to find information about enrolling in NCI-approved clinical trials go here.

For more information from Bryce on the power of genetic sequencing for cancer patients, visit SequenceMe.org. And to learn more about how Intel is working to transform healthcare, visit intel.com/healthcare

Up Next

Animals
Scientists Put Bees in Little Reflective “Vests” for Bee Tracking
bee tracking
Animals
Scientists Put Bees in Little Reflective “Vests” for Bee Tracking
Bee tracking is difficult and expensive, and smaller bees are left out. Lightweight, inexpensive tags may be a solution.

Bee tracking is difficult and expensive, and smaller bees are left out. Lightweight, inexpensive tags may be a solution.

The Future Explored
Cooling the Planet With a Giant Solar Umbrella
Cooling the Planet With a Giant Solar Umbrella
The Future Explored
Cooling the Planet With a Giant Solar Umbrella
Solar geoengineering would cool global temperatures — is it worth it?

Solar geoengineering would cool global temperatures — is it worth it?

Planet Earth
This Magnetic Sponge May Be the Key to Oil Spill Cleanup
Oil spill cleanup
Planet Earth
This Magnetic Sponge May Be the Key to Oil Spill Cleanup
A new magnetic sponge makes the job of oil spill cleanup safer for the environment.

A new magnetic sponge makes the job of oil spill cleanup safer for the environment.

Future of Medicine
The First Universal Flu Vaccine Could Be Coming Soon
The First Universal Flu Vaccine Could Be Coming Soon
Future of Medicine
The First Universal Flu Vaccine Could Be Coming Soon
After flu season, vaccines are outdated and researchers must predict next year’s virus. But soon, we may have a universal flu vaccine that doesn't expire.

After flu season, vaccines are outdated and researchers must predict next year’s virus. But soon, we may have a universal flu vaccine that doesn't expire.

Uprising
Trash-Talking Robots Get Under Our Skin
AI Influence On Human Actions
Uprising
Trash-Talking Robots Get Under Our Skin
Can robots control us? Probably not, but they can influence our actions, as this recent study on human-robot interaction by Carnegie Mellon shows.

Can robots control us? Probably not, but they can influence our actions, as this recent study on human-robot interaction by Carnegie Mellon shows.

Made With Intel
Saving Lives with AI
Saving Lives with AI
Watch Now
Made With Intel
Saving Lives with AI
Artificial intelligence can find hidden patterns in patient’s vital signs - and stop emergencies before they happen.
Watch Now

As hospitals collect more and more data, analyzing it is a challenge and an opportunity. Montefiore Medical Center of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine is a case study in how using artificial intelligence in hospitals can help improve outcomes. They’re working with Intel’s Healthcare AI team to develop machine learning algorithms that can see patterns within it. The result, which they call the Patient Centered...