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After he was diagnosed with life-threatening prostate cancer, Intel’s Bryce Olson sequenced his genome which offered clues to new treatments for his disease. While the current standard of care for cancer patients includes surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, genetic sequencing opens the door for new possibilities beyond these traditional approaches. Bryce explains his personal mission to encourage others to get their genome sequenced, how to do it, and why cancer patients should tell their doctors “sequence me!”


Additional Resources

The National Institute of Health’s National Cancer Institute has a lot of helpful resources for people wanting to learn more about the topics discussed in the video. For an updated list of drugs approved by the FDA for various cancers go here, to learn more about getting your cancer sequenced, visit NCI's database, and to find information about enrolling in NCI-approved clinical trials go here.

For more information from Bryce on the power of genetic sequencing for cancer patients, visit SequenceMe.org. And to learn more about how Intel is working to transform healthcare, visit intel.com/healthcare

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