Skip to main content
Move the World.

After he was diagnosed with life-threatening prostate cancer, Intel’s Bryce Olson sequenced his genome which offered clues to new treatments for his disease. While the current standard of care for cancer patients includes surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, genetic sequencing opens the door for new possibilities beyond these traditional approaches. Bryce explains his personal mission to encourage others to get their genome sequenced, how to do it, and why cancer patients should tell their doctors “sequence me!”


Additional Resources

The National Institute of Health’s National Cancer Institute has a lot of helpful resources for people wanting to learn more about the topics discussed in the video. For an updated list of drugs approved by the FDA for various cancers go here, to learn more about getting your cancer sequenced, visit NCI's database, and to find information about enrolling in NCI-approved clinical trials go here.

For more information from Bryce on the power of genetic sequencing for cancer patients, visit SequenceMe.org. And to learn more about how Intel is working to transform healthcare, visit intel.com/healthcare

Up Next

Prosthetics
How a Paralympic Swimmer Helps Advance AI Bionic Limbs
morgan stickney
Prosthetics
How a Paralympic Swimmer Helps Advance AI Bionic Limbs
Morgan Stickney shares about her experimental Ewing amputations and training for the 2024 Paralympics.

Morgan Stickney shares about her experimental Ewing amputations and training for the 2024 Paralympics.

Bionics
Building an Artificially Intelligent, Open-Source Prosthetic Leg
prosthetic leg
Bionics
Building an Artificially Intelligent, Open-Source Prosthetic Leg
We've come a long way since the first prosthetic leg, and "smart" limbs, equipped with computing capabilities and...

We've come a long way since the first prosthetic leg, and "smart" limbs, equipped with computing capabilities and artificial intelligence, are on the horizon. But for a team of engineers at the University of Michigan and Shirley Ryan AbilityLab, advances still aren't happening fast enough. To move things along, they are giving away the plans to an AI prosthetic leg — hoping researchers will piggyback off each other's work,...

Uprising
What's Special About Cancer-Killing Nanobots? Precision.
medical nanobots
Uprising
What's Special About Cancer-Killing Nanobots? Precision.
These tiny, robotic machines can deliver drugs directly to infected cells, and they're changing the future of medicine.

These tiny, robotic machines can deliver drugs directly to infected cells, and they're changing the future of medicine.

INTEL
Saving Lives with AI
Saving Lives with AI
Watch Now
INTEL
Saving Lives with AI
Artificial intelligence can find hidden patterns in patient’s vital signs - and stop emergencies before they happen.
Watch Now

As hospitals collect more and more data, analyzing it is a challenge and an opportunity. Montefiore Medical Center of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine is a case study in how using artificial intelligence in hospitals can help improve outcomes. They’re working with Intel’s Healthcare AI team to develop machine learning algorithms that can see patterns within it. The result, which they call the Patient Centered...

Dispatches
High Tech Archaeology Found a New Way to Screen for Vitamin D Deficiency
High Tech Archaeology Found a New Way to Screen for Vitamin D Deficiency
Dispatches
High Tech Archaeology Found a New Way to Screen for Vitamin D Deficiency
Vitamin D deficiency is an age-old problem, but new techniques from archaeology may be the key to catching it early.
By Megan Brickley

Vitamin D deficiency is an age-old problem, but new techniques from archaeology may be the key to catching it early.