Skip to main content
Move the World.

After he was diagnosed with life-threatening prostate cancer, Intel’s Bryce Olson sequenced his genome which offered clues to new treatments for his disease. While the current standard of care for cancer patients includes surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, genetic sequencing opens the door for new possibilities beyond these traditional approaches. Bryce explains his personal mission to encourage others to get their genome sequenced, how to do it, and why cancer patients should tell their doctors “sequence me!”

The National Institute of Health’s National Cancer Institute has a lot of helpful resources for people wanting to learn more about the topics discussed in the video.

For an updated list of drugs approved by the FDA for various cancers, go here.

To learn more about getting your tumor sequenced, visit here, and to find information about enrolling in NCI-approved clinical trials, check this out.

For more information from Bryce on the power of genetic sequencing for cancer patients, visit SequenceMe.org.

And to learn more about how Intel is working to transform healthcare, visit Intel.com/Healthcare.

Explore More Stories

Seachange
Coral Reefs Are Dying, but Here’s Why There’s Still Hope
How to Save the Coral Reefs
Watch Now
Seachange
Coral Reefs Are Dying, but Here’s Why There’s Still Hope
Coral reefs are the foundation of ocean life, and yet 50% of them have been lost. Here’s why coral reefs are dying and what one group is doing to stop it.
Watch Now

In the face of a changing climate, coral reefs are dying all over the world. Coral reefs make up the foundation of ocean life, and yet 50% of them have been lost in the last three decades. Are coral reefs in danger of disappearing forever? A group of innovative researchers and divers is racing against the clock to save them.

How a Smartphone Can Detect a Deadly Disease, without a Lab, for Free
How a Smartphone Can Detect a Deadly Disease, without a Lab, for Free
Watch Now
How a Smartphone Can Detect a Deadly Disease, without a Lab, for Free
This app tests for anemia, and it's nearly as good as the gold-standard lab test.
Watch Now

Anemia affects up to ⅓ of the world’s population, but tests are expensive and require complicated devices. Now, an app is able to screen for anemia without even drawing blood. It’s the brainchild of Rob Mannino, a postdoctoral fellow at the Georgia Institute of Technology who has anemia himself. He wanted to fight the disease, so he teamed up with Wilbur Lam, an associate professor at Emory. Recognizing the number of...

Dispatches
A "LinkedIn for Cancer" Helps Myeloma Patients Find Help – and Hope
A "LinkedIn for Cancer" Helps Myeloma Patients Find Help – and Hope
Dispatches
A "LinkedIn for Cancer" Helps Myeloma Patients Find Help – and Hope
The site aims to help scientists discover new treatments – and empower patients to advocate for their own care.
By Kaitlin Ugolik

The site aims to help scientists discover new treatments – and empower patients to advocate for their own care.

What Is Cystic Fibrosis—And What Is It Like?
What Is Cystic Fibrosis—And What Is It Like?
What Is Cystic Fibrosis—And What Is It Like?
What you need to know about this genetic disease, explained by someone who knows it inside and out.
By Ella Balasa

What you need to know about this genetic disease, explained by someone who knows it inside and out.

Dispatches
Personal Genetics Might Solve the Opioid Crisis – and the Pain Crisis
Personal Genetics Might Solve the Opioid Crisis – and the Pain Crisis
Dispatches
Personal Genetics Might Solve the Opioid Crisis – and the Pain Crisis
Why does pain hurt more for some people? Why do others feel nothing at all?
By Erin Young

Why does pain hurt more for some people? Why do others feel nothing at all?

Sponsored
Bringing Virtual Reality to Brain Surgery
Bringing Virtual Reality to Brain Surgery
Watch Now
Sponsored
Bringing Virtual Reality to Brain Surgery
Virtual reality is helping surgeons and patients prepare for complicated, life-saving surgeries in ways never before possible.
Watch Now

Brain surgery is never easy -- for the doctor or the patient. Now, virtual reality is changing the game. Surgical Theater has created a revolutionary new tool, powered by Intel technology, that allows surgeons and patients to prepare for complicated new surgeries in ways never before possible. Surgeons have previously had to rely on 2D images and their imagination to visualize a surgery, but now they are able to use 3D, VR...

Dispatches
The 2018 Nobel Prize Could Mark a Turning Point in the War on Cancer
The 2018 Nobel Prize Could Mark a Turning Point in the War on Cancer
Dispatches
The 2018 Nobel Prize Could Mark a Turning Point in the War on Cancer
More than one in three people will be diagnosed with cancer during their lifetime; new discoveries are helping them...
By Duane Mitchell

More than one in three people will be diagnosed with cancer during their lifetime; new discoveries are helping them fight back.

Dispatches
Why a Third of Antidepressants Are Prescribed for "Off-label" Problems
Why a Third of Antidepressants Are Prescribed for "Off-label" Problems
Dispatches
Why a Third of Antidepressants Are Prescribed for "Off-label" Problems
The "secret life of antidepressants" could open up a host of new treatments.
By Leah Shaffer

The "secret life of antidepressants" could open up a host of new treatments.

Dispatches
Zika Could Be a "Smart Missile" for Brain Cancer
Zika Could Be a "Smart Missile" for Brain Cancer
Dispatches
Zika Could Be a "Smart Missile" for Brain Cancer
Zika can devastate fetal brains; scientists want to turn it against brain tumors instead.

Zika can devastate fetal brains; scientists want to turn it against brain tumors instead.

Superhuman
How 3D-Printing Is Revolutionizing Heart Surgery
How 3D-Printing Is Revolutionizing Heart Surgery
Watch Now
Superhuman
How 3D-Printing Is Revolutionizing Heart Surgery
When a young boy was facing a complicated and dangerous heart operation, his doctors created an exact model of his heart to plan the surgery. And it probably saved his life.
Watch Now

Joseph had one of the most complicated heart conditions his doctors had ever seen. He faced a long and dangerous operation or a heart transplant. Without either, he wouldn't survive. Opting for surgery, Dr. Petros Anagnostopoulos at the American Family Children's Hospital prepped like few have ever done. He and his team 3D-printed a copy of Joseph's heart that they could explore and understand. It was another step forward...