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Move the World.

Ladar Levison spent 10 years building his business, then destroyed it all in one night.

Why? Because Levison’s encrypted email service, called Lavabit, counted NSA leaker Edward Snowden among its users.

When the FBI demanded Lavabit decrypt Snowden’s communications, Levison had two options: become--in his words--“complicit in crimes against the American people,” or destroy his own servers.

He chose the latter.

Now, Levison’s building an even more secure email service, called Dark Mail, to fight back against mass surveillance. Because unencrypted emails are just begging to be read by unintended audiences.

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Future of Medicine
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After flu season, vaccines are outdated and researchers must predict next year’s virus. But soon, we may have a universal flu vaccine that doesn't expire.

After flu season, vaccines are outdated and researchers must predict next year’s virus. But soon, we may have a universal flu vaccine that doesn't expire.

Future of Food
GMO Salmon Could Forever Change the Way We Produce Food
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Bioengineered fish have been known to cause mixed feelings. Unnatural, right? Well, after 30 years of debate on whether we should be eating “Frankenfish,” this funky food source is finally coming to a store near you. Like it or not, GMO salmon and possibly other genetically engineered animal meats will soon be on the shelves of your local supermarket. And, these new futuristic foods may be revolutionizing the global food...

Dispatches
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On The Fringe
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Coded
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Displaying the power of unique technological abilities combined with dogged investigative journalism
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The New Space Race
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Billions spent on projects of questionable benefit - like the plan to capture an asteroid - raises the question:...
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Billions spent on projects of questionable benefit - like the plan to capture an asteroid - raises the question: Should NASA take a back seat in the 21st century space race?

Why Advanced Cancer Patients Need Genetic Sequencing
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After he was diagnosed with life-threatening prostate cancer, Intel’s Bryce Olson sequenced his genome which offered clues to new treatments for his disease. While the current standard of care for cancer patients includes surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, genetic sequencing opens the door for new possibilities beyond these traditional approaches. Bryce explains his personal mission to encourage others to get their...