Skip to main content
Move the World.
fecal testing

Lead Image © Bowl-Am.p Photographer, Emoji-Ivan Kopylov / Adobe Stock

An Israeli startup is looking to bring fecal testing to your own personal throne — a "smart toilet bowl," as the Times of Israel puts it, that monitors your poop and your health.

The clip-on device uses AI-powered computer vision and multi-spectral sensors to analyze your, um, leavings. Using their algorithm, the device measures the chemical composition of the stool as well as its... physical characteristics.

The current clinical focus of their fecal testing is looking for blood hidden inside the stool, which can be an early sign of colorectal cancer. Additionally, they can assay for dehydration and urinary tract infections, as well as constipation and diarrhea (although why one would need a device to know if either of those were happening eludes me).

"We can see molecular composition and substances in urine and stool in a sensitive way that the human eye has no perception for by using spectroscopic signatures of molecules," OutSense CEO Yfat Scialom told VentureBeat.

All the data is uploaded into OutSense's cloud for analysis, the Times of Israel reports, to be delivered to you or your healthcare provider. If something is amiss — say, the presence of blood — a notification gets sent out.

OutSense is looking to begin with remote monitoring of elderly populations. Their fecal testing device has gone through a clinical trial at Israel's Meir Medical Center in Kfar Saba, which found the device capable of measuring blood in stool with 90% accuracy.

The company plans on doing larger pilot studies at hospitals in Israel and with an as-yet-unnamed Japanese business that specializes in remote monitoring tech for the elderly. They'll be using their fecal testing device to scan for dehydration and UTIs, per the Times.

To dial in their device, OutSense also needed to build its own poop catalogue, working with labs and hospitals to acquire the data needed to train its AI. 

"To the best of our knowledge, such data does not exist elsewhere," Scialom told VentureBeat.

Fecal testing can be a filthy rich source of data. Dutch researchers have used sewage to help track coronavirus infections at a municipal level, while a pilot program to scan finishing barns for pig viruses could be the type of tool to help us avoid another pandemic.

One can almost smell the possibilities.

Up Next

Public Health
Scientists Analyze Sewage to Track Coronavirus Infections
Track Coronavirus Infections
Public Health
Scientists Analyze Sewage to Track Coronavirus Infections
Scientists are attempting to track coronavirus infections by analyzing sewage for signs of the virus’ genetic material.

Scientists are attempting to track coronavirus infections by analyzing sewage for signs of the virus’ genetic material.

Virology
Studying Pig Sh*t to Prevent the Next Pandemic
pig virus
Virology
Studying Pig Sh*t to Prevent the Next Pandemic
A pilot program in North Carolina offers one solution to scanning for a potential pig virus in our farm system - slurry testing.

A pilot program in North Carolina offers one solution to scanning for a potential pig virus in our farm system - slurry testing.

Fossil Finds
What Dinosaur Poop Tells Us About Ancient Life
Coprolites and dinosaur poop
Fossil Finds
What Dinosaur Poop Tells Us About Ancient Life
Coprolite, aka dinosaur poop, is giving scientists a surprising glimpse into the world of the dinosaurs. Learn what industry leader Karen Chin has been learning from dino dung.
By Tien Nguyen

Coprolite, aka dinosaur poop, is giving scientists a surprising glimpse into the world of the dinosaurs. Learn what industry leader Karen Chin has been learning from dino dung.

Robotics
Autonomous Boats Could Move People and Goods
autonomous boats
Robotics
Autonomous Boats Could Move People and Goods
MIT launches a new autonomous boat — a fleet of floating platforms that could come together to build bridges, taxi people across a river, or create a party platform.

MIT launches a new autonomous boat — a fleet of floating platforms that could come together to build bridges, taxi people across a river, or create a party platform.

Biology
Smart Vibrator Helps Scientists Study Female Orgasms
female orgasms
Biology
Smart Vibrator Helps Scientists Study Female Orgasms
The Lioness Sex Research Platform is helping scientists study female orgasms by providing anonymized data collected by a smart vibrator.

The Lioness Sex Research Platform is helping scientists study female orgasms by providing anonymized data collected by a smart vibrator.

Medicine
“Antivitamins” Could Be the Cure for Antibiotic Resistance
Antibiotic Resistance
Medicine
“Antivitamins” Could Be the Cure for Antibiotic Resistance
The B1 antivitamin helps bacteria kill competing bacteria, leading researchers to suspect it could help us fight antibiotic resistance and superbugs.

The B1 antivitamin helps bacteria kill competing bacteria, leading researchers to suspect it could help us fight antibiotic resistance and superbugs.

Climate Change
Raising Pacific Islands to Save Them From High Sea Levels
sea level rise
Climate Change
Raising Pacific Islands to Save Them From High Sea Levels
The president of Kiribati announced a new plan to fight against sea level rise: raise the islands.

The president of Kiribati announced a new plan to fight against sea level rise: raise the islands.

This is Our Superhuman Future
This is Our Superhuman Future
This is Our Superhuman Future
With Thanksgiving winding down, take some time to join us on a journey to the frontier of medical technology.
By Mike Riggs

With Thanksgiving winding down, take some time to join us on a journey to the frontier of medical technology.