fall risk
Shoe wearable could help Parkinson’s patients avoid falling
Data-collecting sensors in shoes can predict a Parkinson’s patient’s fall risk almost as accurately as standard walking tests.
over-the-counter hearing aids
You no longer need a prescription to buy hearing aids in the US
The FDA is making over-the-counter hearing aids available to Americans, potentially making the devices cheaper and more accessible.
mobility issues
Lightweight bionic zaps muscles to help you walk longer, faster
The AI-powered Neural Sleeve electrically stimulates the leg muscles to help people with mobility issues walk faster and longer.
ultrasound sticker
MIT’s new ultrasound sticker lets you see inside your body
MIT researchers have created an ultrasound sticker that can continuously monitor a person’s organs and tissues for up to 48 hours.
AR glasses
Magic Leap reveals release date, price for new AR glasses
Two years after laying off half of its staff, Magic Leap is back with a new pair of AR glasses, the enterprise-focused Magic Leap 2.
wearable muscles
“Muscle shirt” increases arm endurance by more than 200%
The Myoshirt acts like “wearable muscles,” using sensors and AI to help people with upper-limb impairments move their arms.
Wearable tech: eating and playing our way to a longer lifespan
Wearable devices can detect the specific molecules in food and our body’s response to it, allowing us to make better dietary decisions.
myopia glasses
Could a former NASA scientist’s “sunlight glasses” protect your vision?
A former NASA scientist has co-developed a pair of glasses designed to prevent myopia by glowing in a precise wavelength of visible light.
exoskeletons
New exoskeleton lets you enter the boxing ring as a robot
Japanese company Skeletonics has developed a new exoskeleton that lets you enter the boxing ring as a nine-foot-tall robot.
nimo smart glasses
Nimo smart glasses are like a PC for your eyes
India-based startup Nimo Planet is now accepting reservations for its Nino smart glasses, which let wearers view six virtual screens.
A fabric that “hears” your heart’s sounds
An MIT team has designed an “acoustic fabric" to convert sound vibrations into electrical signals.
The future of clothing could save your life
Smart textiles may not be gaining ground with fitness gurus, but they are helping patients manage chronic conditions and preventatively monitor their health from home.
wearable robot
Wearable robot helps people with paralysis sing
Seoul National University researchers have built a wearable robot that helps people with ​​spinal cord injuries breathe, cough, and sing.